Universal health coverage reforms: implications for the distribution of the health workforce in low- and middle-income countries

Title Universal health coverage reforms: implications for the distribution of the health workforce in low- and middle-income countries
Year 2015
Author B. McPake and I. Edoka
DOI  
URL http://www.searo.who.int/publications/journals/seajph/issues/seajphv3n3p213.pdf
Journal  
Document Type Webpage
Document Availability Full Text
Classification Other complementary UHC initiatives
Abstract To achieve universal health coverage (UHC), a range of health-financing reforms, including removal of user fees and the expansion of social health insurance, have been implemented in many countries. While the focus of much research and discussion on UHC has been on the impact of health-financing reforms on population coverage, health-service utilization and out-of-pocket payments, the implications of such reforms for the distribution and performance of the health workforce have often been overlooked. Shortages and geographical imbalances in the distribution of skilled health workers persist in many low- and middle-income countries, posing a threat to achieving UHC. This paper suggests that there are risks associated with health-financing reforms, for the geographical distribution and performance of the health workforce. These risks require greater attention if poor and rural populations are to benefit from expanded financial protection.